Sean Magennis | President & COO of YPO


Becoming a member of YPO is a huge milestone in the success of a CEO or entrepreneur.

Becoming the President of YPO is on another level altogether.

Sean Magennis is the President and COO of YPO, which is a global community of more than 27,000 CEOs, presidents, executives, entrepreneurs who come from a rich assortment of industries from 138 countries. 

In this episode, John Corcoran welcomes Sean Magennis to talk about his experience with YPO and EO, how a Forum operates, and what he is excited for in the near future.

In this episode, we also talk about:

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  • Sean’s Time at EO and How He Came to be Involved There
  • EO, YPO, and Conscious Capitalism
  • What is a Forum, and How do They Operate?
  • The Value in Giving Time as a Volunteer
  • What Sean Learned Helping to Grow EO and YPO
  • Sean’s Career Change to be an Executive of YPO, and Why He Decided to Make that Change
  • What Sean is Most Excited for in the Near Future
  • Who Sean Thanks for His Success

Resources Mentioned:

Sponsor: Rise25

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Rise25 Media was created by myself and my business partner, Dr. Jeremy Weisz, and is part of our mission to help connect more entrepreneurs with their ideal prospects and referral partners.

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Episode Transcript

John Corcoran  0:40  

Alright, welcome everyone. My guest on this show is Sean McGinnis. And he is the President and CEO of YPO, which is a global community of more than 27,000 CEOs, presidents, executives, entrepreneurs, and various different members representing a diverse array of different industries and types of businesses in over 138 countries. He will Recite, I’m sure in a moment, the stats, but it is unbelievable. If YPO was a country, it would dominate everything. It is really one of the most influential organizations out there.

And it’s truly an honor to have them here. And he personally has a tremendous amount of experience in business. He is also a seasoned executive. He’s got a background in a number of different entrepreneurial startups. So we’ll ask about that gateway green energy holdings is one of his companies will ask about that, as well. He’s also worked all around the globe.

But first, if you’re new to this show, take a moment and think about what has been the most important factors in your career so far, I’m going to guess when you really distill down your career. One of the critical things is relationships. And so this podcast is all about talking to top business leaders, CEOs, founders and experts and asking them to break down how they built their businesses. And also the key relationships with clients, mentors, peers, referral partners, influencers that are a backbone of any business. So if you find value in this podcast, which I know you will subscribe so you’ll receive the downloads and you will keep improving those relationships Also, before we get to this interview, this podcast is brought to you by Rise25 Media, which is our done for you agency focused on helping b2b businesses to get more clients, referral partners and changing partners using a done for you podcast and dump your content marketing. We’ve got over 20 years experience in this area. And I have to say, you know, if you do it right, a podcast, we were just talking about this beforehand with Sean. It’s one of the best tools out there for connecting with people you admire, and you’re interested in talking to it’s a tool for business development, networking, client acquisition, referral, marketing more, I highly recommend it to everyone. It allows you to have a conversation with people who you admire and like to talk to. So if you want to learn more, go to rise25.com.

So as I mentioned, my guess is Sean McGinnis. And I want to talk about YPO. But before we get to that, before we get into how you got involved in YPO, because I think it’s a really interesting story. You were heavily involved in a similar organization, eo, which I’ve been involved with for a couple years now. Your past international president of the Do in a sense it’s kind of funny, you know? Because I come I cut my background is as a Redskins fan you live in Dallas where the Cowboys are everything it’s kind of like someone going from the Cowboys to the Redskins or vice versa. Is it like was it was there was Did you ever feel guilty? Did people give you a hard time at any point

Sean Magennis  3:18  

you know to little skits of remix so you know if I go back to my early days in EO I was actually recruited into here in the Toronto chapter by two IPOs. The most important one to remember and a signature person in my life from a volunteer standpoint was Peter Thomas. He’s the chairman emeritus of EO and he was the founder of century 21 in Canada, and pita and a bunch of YPO is around the world. We’re helping incubate and start EO chapters. So it wasn’t that unusual. You know the qualifying criteria for EONYPO very different, they still are today and they very complimentary organization. So, you know, when when I got involved, Peter immediately had him a million dollars in sales at the time to join eo, I just qualified, I actually felt like a little bit of an imposter because I was still struggling to make payroll and all those good things. And Peter said, you’re going to get so much out of that. And out of this, but oh, by the way, you actually have to do some work in order to make this experience, you know, meaningful to you. And I said, Peter, what do you mean? He said, Well, you have to be part of the inaugural Executive Committee, you’re not going to get paid. In fact, you have to pay dues, and you have to pay a combination of international and local views. And you’re going to work and you’re going to set up an educational calendar for the year. So you know, that was my sort of first entree into being Volland told. Yeah. And I took it, you know, and ran with it. And you know, to this day, you know, I have a lot to thank Peter Thomas for in the context of your, you know, comment about relationships have been such Many in my life, and then I had the fortune of joining the board. I was a board member here, I think maybe the longest serving nine years ending up as president and chairman of the global EO group. But I went down to Dallas where the white to head office was located in my second year because on the board, I was responsible for bringing forum in TEO, which is our Cornerstone product, as you know, where a group of you know, members get together and we learn from each other on a monthly basis, highly confidential, you know, and it’s moderated and but I came down to Dallas and I spent a weekend IPOs office and the sweet Lady Maria Johnson, who ran forum for YPO kept bringing me these large binders. And in every binder, it was a series of forum exercises and communication starters, and exercises and she said, I bought I said just take that and so I took it back to my office in Toronto, and I had one of my team literally data into every I’m dating myself here, john, this is any old word processing days das was around but you know, to be into big floppy disks, five and a quarter. And, you know, that was the start of my journey but YPO and he always existed on a parallel plane for me. And the beauty of having both in my life and by the way, YPO and EO have a very strong relationship and a number of different levels, local levels and you know, different parts of the world. And even at board level, we constantly in communication with each other. I think that’s healthy. I think, even though we may have similar products and services, there’s enough difference in order for us to have separation, and enough commonality to really benefit each other and I think that big tent philosophy is what I see as being a major is having a major impact. in the world today, not only in, in the volunteer role, you know, the volunteer community is like, like YPO and EO, and YUC and CO and WPO and those types of organizations, but, you know, doing things together and collaborating, I think is stronger than being, you know, on an island.

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